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Jazz Improvisation for Guitar: A Melodic Approach - Tips and Exercises to Master Triads and Extensions


Garrison Fewell Jazz Improvisation For Guitar A Melodic Approach




If you are looking for a way to improve your jazz guitar solos and accompaniments, you might want to check out Garrison Fewell's book Jazz Improvisation for Guitar: A Melodic Approach. This book is a comprehensive guide to using triads and melodic extensions as the basis for creating expressive and musical jazz phrases.




Garrison Fewell Jazz Improvisation For Guitar A Melodic Approach


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Garrison Fewell was a world-renowned jazz guitarist, educator, and author who taught at Berklee College of Music for over 40 years. He was known for his lyrical and melodic style of playing, influenced by some of the great jazz guitarists such as Wes Montgomery, George Benson, Grant Green, Kenny Burrell, and Pat Martino.


What are triads and melodic extensions?




Triads are the simplest and most fundamental chords in music. They consist of three notes: the root, the third, and the fifth. For example, a C major triad is made up of C, E, and G. Triads can be major, minor, diminished, or augmented, depending on the intervals between the notes.


Melodic extensions are notes that go beyond the basic triad and add more color and tension to the harmony. They are usually the seventh, ninth, eleventh, or thirteenth of the chord. For example, a C major seventh chord is a C major triad with an added B note (the seventh). Melodic extensions can also be altered by raising or lowering them by a half step. For example, a C dominant seventh chord with a flat ninth is a C major triad with an added Bb (the seventh) and Db (the flat ninth).


Why use triads and melodic extensions in jazz improvisation?




Many jazz guitarists rely on scales as their main source of melodic material. However, scales can sometimes sound boring, mechanical, or predictable. They can also make it hard to follow the chord changes and create coherent musical sentences.


Triads and melodic extensions offer a more natural and musical way of improvising over jazz harmony. They help you focus on the essential notes of each chord and create strong voice leading between them. They also allow you to create more interesting and varied melodies by using different combinations of triads and extensions over the same chord.


How to use Garrison Fewell's melodic approach?




In his book Jazz Improvisation for Guitar: A Melodic Approach, Garrison Fewell teaches you how to use triads and melodic extensions in various contexts and styles of jazz guitar. He provides numerous examples and exercises to help you master the concepts and techniques. He also shows you how to use guide tones to connect your melodic lines and play the changes.


Guide tones are the most important notes of each chord that define its quality and function. They are usually the third and the seventh of the chord (or their alterations). For example, in a C dominant seventh chord, the guide tones are E (the third) and Bb (the seventh). Guide tones help you outline the harmony and create smooth transitions between chords.


The book also includes a play-along CD with outstanding musical examples and rhythm-section tracks performed by a top-flight trio: Garrison Fewell on guitar, Steve LaSpina on bass, and John Riley on drums. A special bonus track explores the techniques you've learned throughout the book.


Conclusion




Garrison Fewell's Jazz Improvisation for Guitar: A Melodic Approach is a valuable resource for any jazz guitarist who wants to develop a more melodic way of thinking about harmony and improvisation. It will help you broaden your melodic palette using triads and melodic extensions, expand your agility on the fretboard, add articulation to your phrases by playing in the styles of the masters of jazz guitar, use guide tones to connect your lines and play the changes, and develop your own approach to soloing over chord changes.


If you are interested in learning more about this book or buying it online, you can visit Amazon.com, Berklee Online, or Hal Leonard.


What are some of the techniques you will learn in this book?




Some of the techniques you will learn in this book are:


  • How to use triads and melodic extensions over major, minor, dominant, and altered chords.



  • How to use different types of triads (major, minor, diminished, augmented) and extensions (seventh, ninth, eleventh, thirteenth) to create contrast and variety in your melodies.



  • How to use chromaticism, passing tones, enclosures, and approach notes to embellish your triads and extensions.



  • How to use voice leading, common tones, and pivot notes to connect your triads and extensions smoothly over chord changes.



  • How to use guide tones to create strong melodic lines that outline the harmony and resolve to the target notes.



  • How to use guide tones to build voicings for comping that support the melody and the soloist.



  • How to use rhythm, articulation, dynamics, and phrasing to add expression and groove to your melodies.



  • How to use motifs, sequences, patterns, and variations to develop your melodic ideas and create coherent musical statements.



  • How to analyze and emulate the styles of some of the great jazz guitarists who used triads and melodic extensions in their solos and accompaniments.



Who is this book for?




This book is for any jazz guitarist who wants to improve their melodic skills and expand their harmonic vocabulary. It is suitable for intermediate to advanced players who have some knowledge of jazz theory and harmony. It is also a great resource for teachers who want to introduce their students to a more melodic approach to jazz improvisation.


If you are ready to take your jazz guitar playing to the next level, you will find this book a valuable and inspiring guide. You will learn how to use triads and melodic extensions as the foundation for creating beautiful and musical jazz solos and accompaniments. You will also discover how to apply these concepts and techniques in various jazz contexts and styles. You will develop a more melodic way of thinking about harmony and improvisation that will enrich your musical expression and creativity.


What are some of the benefits of using this book?




Some of the benefits of using this book are:


  • You will improve your musical ear and intuition by learning to hear and play triads and melodic extensions in various contexts.



  • You will develop your fretboard knowledge and technique by learning to play triads and melodic extensions in different positions, inversions, and fingerings.



  • You will enhance your creativity and improvisational skills by learning to use triads and melodic extensions as building blocks for creating original and expressive melodies.



  • You will increase your harmonic awareness and understanding by learning to use triads and melodic extensions as tools for analyzing and interpreting jazz harmony.



  • You will expand your repertoire and vocabulary by learning to play excerpts and solos in the styles of some of the great jazz guitarists who used triads and melodic extensions in their playing.



How to use this book effectively?




Here are some tips on how to use this book effectively:


  • Read the introduction and the overview of each chapter carefully to understand the main concepts and objectives.



  • Listen to the audio examples and play-along tracks attentively to hear how triads and melodic extensions sound and how they are applied in different situations.



  • Practice the exercises and examples slowly and accurately, paying attention to the notes, rhythms, articulations, and fingerings.



  • Use a metronome or a drum machine to practice with a steady tempo and groove.



  • Record yourself playing the exercises and examples and listen back critically to evaluate your progress and identify areas for improvement.



  • Transpose the exercises and examples to different keys to increase your familiarity with the fretboard and the harmony.



  • Variation is the key to creativity. Experiment with different ways of playing triads and melodic extensions, such as changing the order, direction, rhythm, or octave of the notes.



  • Apply what you learn from this book to your own playing. Use triads and melodic extensions to improvise over songs that you know or want to learn.



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