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Avant - 4 Minutes



(Avant)i only got 4 minutes to do what i gotta do to prove to youthat im gone do anythingi only got 4 minutes to say what i gotta say to make you stayand show you that i dont changecuz in 4 minutes ill never have my girl againin 4 minutes ima lose her to some other manfour no less no moreim desperate cuz the clocks tickini got 4 minutes to go




Avant - 4 Minutes


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(Krayzie)i only got a couple minutes to spit it to make you feel itn tell ya how you could b livin tellin if ya kick ityou make me feel like i should take it easy on the pimpinyou sho got everything i need n i aint even trippin, reallyso if you wanna run away wit krazie just let me knowtime is steady tickin baby we got ta gotime just wont give me time but if you ride time i will find yea yea


i only got 4 minutes to do what i gotta do to prove to youthat im gone do anythingi only got 4 minutes to saywhat i gotta say to make you stayand show you that i done changecuz in 4 minutes ill never have my girl againin 4 minutes ima lose her to some other manfour no less no moreim desperate cuz the clocks tickini got 4 minutes to go


i only got 4 minutes to do what i gotta do to prove to youthat im gone do anythingi only got 4 minutes to say what i gotta say tomake you stayand show you that i done changecuz in 4 minutes ill never have my girl againin 4 minutes ima lose her to some other manfour no less no moreim desperate cuz the clocks tickini got 4 minutes to go


[Chorus]I only got 4 minutes to do what I gotta do to prove to you that I'm gonna do anythingOnly got 4 minutes say what I gotta say to make you stay and show you that I done changeCause in 4 minutes I'll never have my girl again In 4 minutes Imma lose her to some other man4 no less no more I'm jus praying cause the clocks tickingOnly got 4 minutes to go


Only got 4 minutes to tell you everything I love about you4 minutes to say I need you, I can't live without youI'm out of time gotta say what's on my mindJust to keep you in my lifeAw, damn I'm outta time


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Place a large non stick saucepan over a medium heat, when the pan is hot add a touch of olive oil, followed by the onion mix. Saute with a sprinkling of salt for 3-4 minutes. This is where you develop a great base flavour.


For four minutes and thirty-three seconds, a pianist sits in front of a piano, raising and shutting the lid a total of three times throughout the piece (movements). That's it. It's four minutes and thirty-three seconds of silence.


Cage wanted the audience to think differently about music and sound. He wanted the audience to shift perspective from what they were expecting to hear, to what they were not expecting to hear. Try it now - stop whatever you're doing for 4 minutes and 33 seconds and listen.


My candidate may not make many other lists. But its ultimate influence over the music of the future may come to tower over all of the more obvious choices. It's John Cage's 4'33" ("four minutes, thirty-three seconds").


Most music is trivialized by attempts to describe it. ("The melody is announced by the flutes...") That's not a problem with 4'33". Here's how one performance went: A tuxedoed performer came on stage, sat at a grand piano, opened the lid, occasionally turned some music pages but otherwise sat as quietly as possible for 4 minutes and 33 seconds, then rose, bowed and left. And that was it.


The "point" of 4'33", and the appeal of most avant-garde stuff, is that unlike most music it presents an open process rather than an attempt to realize a composer's prescribed directives to achieve a specific intended result. It's an invitation, not a command.


And yet, few people genuinely like to listen to modern classical music. (And here I don't mean mainstream derivative stuff, but real cutting-edge avant-garde.) Often the concept turns out to be far more interesting than its execution - once you acknowledge the basic scheme you really don't want to have to sit through it. 4'33" is one of the very few pieces that has the opposite appeal. Its idea sounds simplistic and even stupid, but performances are fascinating, since they involve each listener so fully and intimately. And it's over before you can get bored or uncomfortable.


Let me end with a prediction and a suggestion. Here's the prediction: in future decades or centuries even Stravinsky will become an historical relic, his sound quaint and old-fashioned, while Cage will remain ever-fresh and vital. And here's the suggestion: take four minutes and thirty-three seconds from your own life and find some way to perform the piece yourself. Genius, like music, comes in so many varieties.


While opera is widely enjoyed, I can take a certain comfort that so many other well-informed classical buffs share my hesitancy toward the avant-garde. Perhaps the problem stems from its inherent newness - without standards of traditional taste, it's so hard to separate the brilliance from the dross, the true innovators from the screwballs, the serious artists from the pretenders. Without a basis to serve as a frame of reference, informed opinions are difficult to develop or justify (or perhaps all opinions become equally valid).


Clearly, 4'33" presents a severe challenge. It heralds the replacement of traditional classical music, based as it is on the repertoire of the past rather than the developments of the present, with a far different notion of conceptual art, in which an idea or process (and not necessarily a "musical" one) is taken to an extreme. Here are two personal favorites among the few avant-garde works I've come to enjoy.


Here's another one - Steve Reich's It's Gonna Rain. An introduction deconstructs a sermon chanted by a preacher in a park. Then, copies of a half-second tape loop of the title phrase ("It's gonna RAIN it's gonna RAIN it's gonna RAIN it's gonna RAIN...") are played simultaneously on two machines whose slight speed variation causes them to diverge and then regain sync over the course of several minutes. After a fascinating evolution of slowly-changing cross-rhythms the inevitable convergence approaches, and the tension becomes as palpable as anything in Wagner, finally released with the completion of the phrase ("... it's gonna RAIN after a while") as the piece ends.


All I can say in conclusion is this: as with all music, what really matters is to preserve and disseminate works that have the potential to make a positive and lasting contribution to humanity. Classical music can't stay forever stuck in a rut of increasingly old product. But what will eventually turn on future generations? Where will they look to find the splendor of truly meaningful music? Will today's avant-garde become the classical repertoire of the future? Or has this stuff already strayed too far from the traditional psycho-acoustic moorings that enable us to understand and internalize music so it can immeasurably enrich our lives?


In the latter half of the 20th Century, Raymond Rohauer was one of the nation's foremost proponents of experimental cinema. This two-disc collection continues Kino's tribute to the Rohauer Collection, including the early works of Stan Brakhage and influential films by Willard Maas, Gregory Markopoulos, Marie Menken, Dimitri Kirsanoff, Jean Mitry, Sidney Peterson and others. The pièce de résistance is Jean Isidore Isou's passionate manifesto of film aesthetics Traitéde Bave et D'eternité (Venom and Eternity), which sparked a riot when it premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 1951. This edition of Venom includes 34 minutes of footage never seen in the United States.


As one might expect, many listeners found this view unpalatable, despite the fact that the hall itself could be a metaphor for Cage's ideal union of music and nature. There was an uproar. People thought 4'33" was a joke or some kind of avant-garde nose-thumbing. During a post-concert discussion, as Cage biographer David Revill notes, one local artist stood up and suggested, "Good people of Woodstock, let's drive these people out of town."


Avant-garde music, or experimental music, is a type of music that is meant to push the boundaries of "what music is." It started in the 1940s and 1950s after World War II. Some famous avant-garde composers were John Cage, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Henry Cowell.


This is a song by the popular English rock band The Beatles. It appeared on their album The Beatles, also known as The White Album (released in 1968.) "Revolution 9" is over 8 minutes of random sounds, and someone repeatedly saying "number 9...number 9...number 9...number 9..." It was mostly the work of John Lennon and his wife, Yoko Ono.


This is a song by the American grunge band Pearl Jam. It is the last song on their third album Vitalogy, released in 1994. It is over seven minutes long. It is made up of conversations between mental patients in asylums, and psychiatrists, with distorted bass guitar and drums laid over them.


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